Showers

This gallery contains 1 photo.

Check out this tub/shower in Jerusalem’s 4 star Grand Court hotel.  It only covers half of the opening.  Huh? I found it virtually impossible to avoid a flooded floor after taking a shower.  No matter how hard I tried to … Continue reading

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Over the Wall

Over the Wall

Over the Wall

I didn’t take this picture; found it in my archives and thought it was funny.

In 2005 my daughter was studying in Ireland for a semester.  One of her friends took this picture of her going over the wall.

It looks like she is breaking out of prison. She wasn’t in a convent or anything, maybe just bored with studying, but why leave like that?  Her story of “just trying to get a picture” never got much traction with me.   Geeez, I would never do anything like that!

Thought for the Day:  The whims of youth break all the rules.          Homer

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Down and Dirty

Safe at Third

Safe at Third

Baseball was made for little boys.  Everything about the game is filthy, and little boys would rather roll in the dirt than take a bath.  The baselines are dirt, the dugouts are dirt, and the entire infield at little league fields is 100% dirt.

The batter picks up a handful of dirt and pours it from one hand to the other so his sweaty hands won’t slip on the bat. Pitcher does the same thing so the ball doesn’t slip out of his hand.  The pitcher spits.  The batter spits.  The umpire uses his whisk broom to sweep the dirt off home plate.  Infielders kick the dirt to watch the dust bunnies blow across the infield.  Disgruntled coaches kick dirt on the umpire’s shoes to protest a call.

America’s past time is designed so little boys can get dirty.  But the ultimate thrill for a seven year old is to slide into base, especially home plate, where the dirt is finer than cosmetic powder and they can lose themselves in a mushroom cloud of dirt.

Thought for the Day:  Little League baseball is a good thing ’cause it keeps the parents off the streets and the kids out of the house.                                                              Yogi Berra

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Bohemian Cafe

 

Bohemian Cafe

Bohemian Cafe

 

Bohemian Cafe

Bohemian Cafe Sign

Another iconic restaurant of Omaha is closing soon.  The Bohemian Cafe, located on south 13th St. just south of William St, will close in September.

The restaurant opened in 1924, and moved to the current location in 1959, where it has been the gathering place for Bohemian, Czech and Polish immigrants/descendants ever since. Waitresses wear traditional dress like the photo at left, and serve generous portions of traditional hearty Czech dishes: Svickova, Jaeger Schnitzel, Polish Sausage, Roast Pork Loin,  and Hasenphefer, all served with liver-dumpling soup, mashed potatoes or dumplings, sauerkraut or sweet and sauer cabbage, and rye bread.   Kolaches for dessert.  Oh, and don’t forget their famous chilled ceramic mugs filled with Czech Urquell beer.

Our family makes it there a couple times a year for special occasions.  The atmosphere is memorable and the food will stick to your ribs for days.  Where will we go now?

Thought for the Day:  Without work, there are no kolaches.     Czech Proverb

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Repurposed Tires

tire sandals

Maasai tire sandals

Maasai Tribesmen

Maasai Tribesmen

The Maasai are a semi-nomadic tribe that move their livestock within ever-shrinking grazing rights of Northern Tanzania and Kenya. Descendants of a fierce warrior nation, today’s Maasai are peaceful and friendly except when it comes to their cattle.

They are easily recognized by their brightly-colored one-piece garments known as kanga, red being a favored color, but blue is also popular.  Sandals, once made of cowhide, are now made from rubber tires.

I thought tire sandals was a relatively new thing, but as my good friend Cliff Claven (barfly know-it-all from “Cheers”) would say, “Ahhh, it’s a little known fact that the Maasai were making sandals from tires as early as the the 1930’s.”  Ernest Hemingway mentions the Maasai footwear in his book, “The Green Hills of Africa”, published in 1935.

Sidenote: Hemingway’s book is an interesting “journal” of his ten week safari.  As a book, I found it absent of plot, climax and ending.   Interesting only because I had been there.  Uggh!

Thought for the Day:  One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.   (including books)                                                                                                                                                      Idiom

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Affordable Transportation

Affordable Transportation

Affordable Transportation

Bicycles are a common mode of transportation in Tanzania.   Motorcycles and cars are common in big cities, but are impractical and too expensive in the rural areas.

I found this bike parked behind one of the buildings at the Hai Vocational School.  I suspect it was owned by one of the instructors, as the students could barely afford the tuition, let alone the luxury of a bicycle.  The condition of this bike was typical of all the bikes I saw in Tanzania; i.e. serviceable, but “fully depreciated”.

Notice the door jamb’s severely bowed right side.  I found this ironic, since the vocational school taught carpentry, masonry, electric wiring, welding and other common trades.   Everything I was shown was made by the students and very well done.  I hope this doorway was not constructed by one of the schools’ alumni.

Thought for the Day:  Any job worth doing is worth doing well.                                                                                                                                                     Idiom

 

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Double Exposure

Double Exposure

Double Exposure

Durham Museum Statue

Durham Museum Statue

I merged a recent profile shot of my granddaughter with a photo I had taken of the statue of a girl waiting in the train station at the Durham Museum.

Not too bad a match.  The combined image is more profound than I expected.

The statue, cast in stone so to speak and never-changing, will never have a chance to grow and evolve like my grand children are doing.  The statue is what it is, but my granddaughter will mature and change a little bit every day.  I can go to the museum any time in the future, and the statue will be the same, but missing a day of my granddaughter or other loved ones is a version of them that is gone forever.

Thought for the Day:  Certain things, they should stay as they are.  You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone.                                                                                                                                                       J. D. Salinger

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Nature’s Humor

Speared Pin Oak Leaf

Speared Pin Oak Leaf

After the crocus, daffodil and tulips poke through the ground spearheading the invasion of Spring, other plants are quick to follow suit. Slow at first, but momentum builds fast as Spring sheds its dark and gloomy shroud of Winter.

Before long there is a vertical stampede of growth.  Everything is popping up providing a noticeable daily change in contour of the flower bed.

The Naked Lady plant in this photo grew so fast, it impaled the dry Pin Oak leaf.  I thought it was an exclamation mark on Spring’s way of saying, “Take that, ole man Winter!”

Thought for the Day:  There has to be evil so good can prove its purity above it.  Buddha

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